Big Omaha 2014 artist installations are here

For Big Omaha attendees, we strive to present an environment that allows for interactions that result in growth of knowledge and meaningful connections. Attendees should be able to experience this not only from the stage, but at every meal, lounge and party from May 7-9. As a way to encourage moments of discovery and interaction,

For Big Omaha attendees, we strive to present an environment that allows for interactions that result in growth of knowledge and meaningful connections. Attendees should be able to experience this not only from the stage, but at every meal, lounge and party from May 7-9.

As a way to encourage moments of discovery and interaction, we call on artists to present ideas in a way we could never imagine. The ideas presented by these installations help move the conversation forward and are a key part of every Big Omaha. This year we are thrilled to work with the following four artist groups.

Pandemonium

Another What Cheer original, Pandemonium measures the volume of Big Omaha in both physical and digital spaces. This measurement will in turn be displayed visually to the audience throughout the conference. In essence, Pandemonium allows attendees to see just how “spirited” they are.

Our friends at What Cheer have a long artist installation history with Big Omaha. Small TalkSPDO and Spun have all been What Cheer creations that have engaged attendees, allowing for meaningful connections to be made.

Pins and Threads

Inspired by social media, cartography and information graphics, Pins and Threads is an emergent piece created by University of Nebraska and AToM’s Brian Kelly that works through the interactions of the attendees. For this installation, a map of the United States is temporarily projected for contextual reference. Attendees are encouraged to locate a custom profile map pin on the city where they are currently working. This profile pin will identify each person’s area of work emphasis, gender and number of times they have attended Big Omaha. This installation is a twist on social networking, except rather than having a virtual presence, connections are tangible and manifest the conference demographic. Eventually, the projected lines of the map, which we understand as borders between states, are removed. At this point, all that remains are the avatars of the people and their relative connection.

Tethon 3D: Big Omaha Farm

The use of 3D printing, otherwise known as additive manufacturing, is growing exponentially. Numerous materials are utilized, including plastics, metal, plaster, clay and food. Ceramic 3D printing has value in a number of industries, including fine art, architecture, biomedical research and custom design, just to name a few.

A 3D ceramics printer will create ceramic Big Omaha cows, available for purchase for $19.99. To support our friends at KANEKO, we invite you to pre-order your unique Big Omaha souvenir today. Cows will be for sale at the event as well, and will be shipped post-conference.

Heartland 2050: Shape Our Future

By 2050, our region’s population will double. Participate in the ongoing dialogue with our region focused on co-creating a vision for the future. Use the interactive tool to share what your priorities are, and take a look at how our region performs in four possible growth scenarios, based on your priorities. Your feedback will help shape our future. If we understand what matters to us, we can work smarter to achieve a community that we all want.

Specter

For the second year in a row, we are excited to host a UNL student group artist installation. Last year attendees’ experienced the eye-catching PaperJam. The group’s new installation, Specter, will offer a commentary on water usage and skewed perceptions that often surround sustainability. This interactive exhibit is sure to visually awe participants while providing a catalyst for engaging and relevant conversations about global water usage.

Gerard Pfung

Gerard brings a unique eye and penchant for the visual arts that draws the viewer into his work.  As Gerard explains, “What inspires me is the people I meet on my journey.  The interaction with people along with the use of vibrant colors allows me to capture the presence and the moment at that particular time and place of those around me.” Gerard will not noly be showcasing his previous work at Big Omaha, but attendees will get the opportunity to experience his creative process as they watch him create new work throughout the conference.

 

Credits: Photo by Malone & Co.

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