Sioux Falls B2B software integration developer Prismatic launches today

A Sioux Falls-based embedded integration platform developer for B2B software companies announced its general availability launch today. The company, Prismatic, strives to provide an easy-to-use integration platform in an era of increasingly specialized business software usage. A few years ago, Prismatic CEO and co-founder Michael Zuercher noticed a need for B2B software companies to have…

Logo courtesy Prismatic
Logo courtesy Prismatic

A Sioux Falls-based embedded integration platform developer for B2B software companies announced its general availability launch today. The company, Prismatic, strives to provide an easy-to-use integration platform in an era of increasingly specialized business software usage.

A few years ago, Prismatic CEO and co-founder Michael Zuercher noticed a need for B2B software companies to have more time and energy to dedicate to their specialty, as many were spending more and more of their time on research and development-related integrations, which in turn meant these companies had less time to focus on their core product. Zuercher formed Prismatic to solve that problem and, after a year and a half of R&D, is ready to launch. 

More than just an issue of time management, Zuercher said he thinks integrations are harder than they should be for B2B software companies. This causes delays during customer onboarding, and wasted time across the many teams who have to get involved. However, one of the challenges Zuercher has noticed while developing the product is finding a way to help those companies navigate their way to a better path.

“Building the solution is one thing, it’s another thing to help people see how it fits into what they’re doing and how to adopt it.” Zuercher said.

There’s more demand for integration all the time, Zuercher notes, and there have been integration platforms for as long as there’s been software. However, no platform caters specifically to B2B software even though these companies are very familiar with adapting to software integration.

But what Zuercher has noticed—and expects to continue to notice—is that software companies are now expected to provide those integrations standard to clients. In Zuercher’s opinion, that’s where a fun problem meets its solution.

GUI screenshot courtesy Prismatic

“Prismatic is focused on serving B2B software companies who can then serve their customers with out of the box integrations.” Zuercher said.

Billing itself as a solution provider to B2B clients, Prismatic offers purpose-built infrastructure, intuitive integration designer, integration deployment and support, and an embeddable customer experience all built to be software developer-friendly.

Prismatic CTO and co-founder Justin Hipple said his company’s solution empowers non-developers to take on more of the integration workload than ever before, and key to that approach is a relentless focus on developer experience. 

“For a platform like this to succeed in the real world of a B2B software company, it has to be something developers actually want to use and that they can tailor to work the way it needs to for their product and their organization,” Hipple said. “We’ve built Prismatic from day one to be developer-friendly and extensible at every turn.”

Prismatic has found early traction with B2B software companies in wide-ranging verticals, including Raven Industries (RAVN), a leading provider of precision agriculture technology.

“With Prismatic, we’re able to deliver integrations in far less time while streamlining our engineering effort,” said Raven Engineering Manager Chris Rallis. “Prismatic has given us the ability to more widely build integrations across our teams. It has also allowed our customer-facing teams to handle customer-specific deployment. These are two key examples of how Prismatic makes our developers more productive and moving forward on the innovations we have happening all over at Raven.”

Prismatic looks to disrupt a market by creating a new solution to what Zuercher sees as a mostly unrecognized problem. It was this spirit of problem solving that interested Zuercher in entrepreneurship and inspired him to launch his first company at 19. An idea that started as a summer job turned into a career vehicle that eventually employed over 200 people. 

“I started my first company accidentally; that’s the complete truth,” Zuercher said. “I wish I could say I saw some grand opportunity and had a spreadsheet that said this was a good idea. I just thought it was a fun problem.”

While being an entrepreneur was not Zuercher’s original goal, by now he’s seasoned enough in the position to promote the growth of the Sioux Falls’ tech entrepreneurial ecosystem. Still, he does seem more comfortable with the role of problem solver than ecosystem analyst. 

“I don’t think I ever really sat back and said I want to be an entrepreneur,” Zuercher said. “I’ve been fortunate to find a couple of pretty interesting problems with some really good people to work with.”

 

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