KANEKO opens doors for artist talks on Friday, offers views of creativity during isolation

Three events this week mark a slight return to normal for KANEKO.  While the pandemic forced Omaha’s internationally renowned arts and culture nonprofit to curtail its in-person programming, the organization continued its investigation into human creativity at a time beset by intersecting tragedies—from the life-defining disruptions of illness, loss and economic devastation, to the subtler…

Juan de Dios Sánchez. Photo courtesy KANEKO
Juan de Dios Sánchez. Photo courtesy KANEKO

Three events this week mark a slight return to normal for KANEKO

While the pandemic forced Omaha’s internationally renowned arts and culture nonprofit to curtail its in-person programming, the organization continued its investigation into human creativity at a time beset by intersecting tragedies—from the life-defining disruptions of illness, loss and economic devastation, to the subtler cosmic background radiation of boredom, isolation and uncertainty.

These conditions have contributed to a phenomenon known as languishing, a kind of collective blah that the New York Times reported on last week. But they haven’t entirely put a damper on the creative spirit, despite evidence demonstrating the stress of the pandemic has made it a lot harder for us to think outside the box and sustain intellectual output. 

As they always have done in the face of upheaval, many artists have kept on producing anyway, including Juan de Dios Sánchez, a Mexican ceramicist. 

On Friday, April 30, Sánchez will give the public a glimpse into his first ceramics exhibit at KANEKO in three back-to-back artist talks. Each talk will begin with a demonstration of his Raku-fired technique and will be followed by a Q&A session, as well as 30 minutes for audience members to tour the exhibit, called “In the Blood of All Mexicans.” 

The events will take place at 6, 7 and 8 pm and will be limited to 50 guests each. All visitors to KANEKO public spaces and galleries must wear masks and maintain a six-foot distance from others. As always, admission is free and open to the public.

While there, visitors can check out other KANEKO offerings, such as the Tessellation Project, a communal art exhibit involving user submissions springing from their experiences of sheltering in place. As the organization’s website puts it:

The Tessellation Project began in March 2020 as a way for KANEKO to engage individuals and communities sheltering in place in response to COVID-19. To guarantee safety, people were asked to submit their art digitally, and in a few months over a thousand digital and video images were submitted, carrying with them, unique stories of managing lives in a time of seclusion. Since then, some pieces have been shipped or submitted in person, adding a new dimension to this constantly changing exhibit.

For more information, visit the kaneko.org

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