Return of ‘Friday night lights’ puts Hudl in media spotlight

Anymore, Hudl's ubiquity with high school football teams seems to rival that of marching bands and homecoming courts. All right, that might be a bit of an exaggeration. But with a stable of clients that includes more than 6,000 high school football teams, Hudl, a web-based video and analysis tool for sports coaches, is the

Mentions of Lincoln, Neb.-based Hudl in recent press appeared across the U.S., such as the articles above (from left) in Ohio, Louisiana and Oregon. Screenshots from respective websites.

Anymore, Hudl‘s ubiquity with high school football teams seems to rival that of marching bands and homecoming courts.

All right, that might be a bit of an exaggeration. But with a stable of clients that includes more than 6,000 high school football teams, Hudl, a web-based video and analysis tool for sports coaches, is the No. 1 player in the high school football space. And with its dominant position in an ever-expanding market, the Lincoln-based startup is popping up in stories from media outlets all across the country.

Since high school football season kicked off a few weeks back, the coverage of Hudl has been almost enough to populate its very own Prairie Moves. That widespread use and attention for Hudl is noteworthy not just because it’s a testament to the company’s rapid growth — Hudl launched at the high school level with 12 pilot clients in 2008 — but also because it was made possible by a significant shift in strategy.

As Hudl co-founder and COO John Wirtz (left, photo from hudl.comdiscussed at Cornstalks last month, Hudl started as a company that targeted college and professional teams.

The company’s original system, Wirtz said at Cornstalks “definitely was geared for Division I and NFL teams. It was kind of expensive, a little weighty, and that’s where we saw our future was we were going to have every NFL and every Division I football team in the country.” But Hudl soon recognized the opportunity that existed in the high school space, and, well … a roundup of recent stories involving the company should provide an idea of how that decision has worked out.

Editor’s Note: Danny Schreiber, author of Prairie Moves, contributed to this post.

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